Recycled plastic soda bottles are a perennial favorite for making fun crafts with. Here are 4 ideas for projects that are not just fun to make, but are fun to use as well. 

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4 Delightful Craft Ideas for Recycling Plastic Soda Bottles

by Patricia Strasser

If you're one of the numerous individuals eager in finding uses for old and seemingly unusable things, you may be interested in these craft projects for soda bottles made of plastic in a variety of sizes. From small, handy things like wallet inserts to distinctive home decor, there are many things you can do for plastic soda bottles. Here are some ingenious recycling projects you can consider:

A bird feeder

Nature enthusiasts will like this recycling activity involving soda bottles. Prepare a transparent 1-liter soda bottle, a craft knife, wooden spoons, an eye screw, some string and some bird feed. First, rinse the clear 1000 ml size soda bottle and use the cutter to carefully cut out diagonal openings on opposite sides. The openings should measure one half inch. Put the wooden spoons through the openings; the wooden spoons will serve as perches for the birds. Place birdseed to the bottle and stick in the eye screw into the bottle cap so you can insert in a string for hanging the feeder.

An ocean life bottle display

A miniature ocean life display will amuse youngsters and let them know the beauty of both marine life and recycling. You will require a 2000 ml plastic bottle, water, vegetable oil, blue food coloring, silver glitter,plastic aquarium decor, seashells and glue. Remove the tag from the bottle and put water in it until it is half full. Fill the remaining half with vegetable oil. Add some of the blue food coloring to imitate ocean water and mix in a few of the glitter. You can now add artificial aquarium decorations just like artificial plants, fish-shaped toys and seashells. Make sure the bottle cap is screwed tightly by gluing it in place.

A candy goblet

Youngsters who like "magical" objects will find a candy goblet recycled from a soda bottle both useful and unique. For the project, you will need a plastic soda bottle, a craft knife, craft glue and numerous adornments. Cut off the bottom of the bottle. Then put some crafting adhesive on the top opening of the bottle and fasten it to the middle of the base to make a goblet form. You can then glue decorations such as plastic gems on the surface to make the goblet look more colorful. Fill the holder with sweets like gumdrops and gumballs.

An Easter-themed basket

This project is great for Easter. Get the following things: a clean, 2-liter soda bottle, some masking tape, a hole punch, a pipe cleaner, glue and also Easter-themed decorations. The first thing you need to do is to cut away 4" from the soda bottle to create the basket's base. Put adhesive tape on the cut edge so that it will be smooth. Punch holes on opposite sides of the basket with the puncher. Put in a long pipe cleaner through the holes to make a handle. You can now glue on different adornments that represent Easter like stickers or recycled fancy paper cut into rabbit shapes or eggs. Lastly, load the basket with artificial grass or colored Easter eggs.

In addition to being practical, these craft projects can be great for teaching children the importance of recycling.

About the Author
Written by Patricia Strasser. If you're looking for durable wallet inserts that you can utilize for crafts, visit http://walletinsertspro.com/wallet-inserts/

Article Source: GoArticles.com


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